Collection: Guidance

Course Descriptions

REGISTRATION AND SCHEDULE CHANGES

 

The master schedule of class offerings, teacher and room assignments are all derived from the tallies of spring registration.  For these reasons it is extremely important that students not change their schedules once their selections are made. It is very important that each student discuss class scheduling with his/her parent/guardian. However, as the master schedule is constructed, conflicts may occur in some student schedules. Every effort is made to give students the courses they sign up for during registration or the alternates selected. If that is not possible, the Guidance Department will place students in courses that are still open.  Once the semester starts, schedule change requests will be processed only with the approval of the administration.

Details

AG-SCIENCE

 

ALL ASPECTS OF THE INDUSTRY

 

COURSE TITLE:  ADVANCED AGRICULTURE SCIENCE

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4           

PREREQUISITE: Successful Completion of Introduction to the Agriculture Industry.

 

This second-year course builds on the basic skills and knowledge gained from the introductory course.  Major units of instruction include advanced plant and soil science, advanced animal science, hydraulics, plumbing, forestry, and robotics.  Applied math/science skills are stressed throughout the course.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ADVANCED AGRICULTURE TECHNOLOGY/ROBOTICS

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4                                                                                                  

PREREQUISITE:  Successful Completion of Agricultural Technology OR Advanced Ag-Science.

 

This course is designed to reinforce and extend students understanding of physical science in relation to agricultural robotics and the scientific process. This course will associate scientific and math principles and concepts with relevant applications in agricultural robotics. Topics of study are in the areas of how robotics can be used in scientific investigations, environmental/natural resource systems and agricultural production systems, agricultural structural systems, energy and power systems, agricultural mechanics and machine systems, and food processing systems.

 

COURSE TITLE: AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS

CREDITS: ½ Unit – One Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Intro to the Agriculture Industry, Advanced Agricultural Science

 

This course will provide students with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to manage personal finances and develop into a successful entrepreneur and/or businessperson.  Instructional units include:  business ownership types, starting an agribusiness, managing and operating an agribusiness, financing an agribusiness, managing personal finances, record keeping and financial management of an agribusiness, local, state, and federal taxes, sales and marketing, economic principles, and developing employability skills.  Student skills will be enhanced in math, reading comprehension, and writing through agribusiness applications.  Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

 

COURSE TITLE:  AGRICULTURE CONSTRUCTION

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4                                                                                                  

PREREQUISITE:  None

 

(Previously called Woodworking I) This advanced course focuses on the knowledge, hands-on skills, and work place skills applicable to construction in the agricultural industry.  Major units of instruction include: personal safety, hand tools, power tools, blue print reading, and surveying, construction skills in carpentry, plumbing, electricity, concrete, block laying, drywall and painting.  Careers such as agricultural engineers, carpenter, plumber, electrician, concrete and block layers, finishers, safety specialists, and other related occupations will be examined.  Improving workplace and computer skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

 

COURSE TITLE: AGRICULTURAL SALES

CREDITS: ½ Unit – One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE:  Intro to the Agriculture Industry, Advanced Ag Science

 

This course is designed to develop student knowledge and skills in agricultural sales and marketing, commodity marketing, agricultural economics, and international agriculture.  Instructional units include:  successfully starting an agribusiness, developing a marketing plan, pricing, advertising, and selling products and services, communicating with customers, applying commodity trading techniques, basic economic principles, the international agribusiness economy, and agricultural career opportunities.  Student skills will be enhanced in math, reading comprehension, communications, and writing through agribusiness applications. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

 

COURSE TITLE:  AGRICULTURE  TECHNOLOGY

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4                                                                                                  

PREREQUISITE:  None

 

(Previously called Intro to Drafting) This course focuses on the knowledge, hands-on skills, and work place skills applicable to design in the agricultural industry.  Major units of instruction include: personal safety, blue print reading, blue print creation, Mechanical Design, CAD, understanding of surveying, construction skills in carpentry, plumbing, electricity, concrete, block laying, drywall and painting.  Careers such as agricultural engineers, carpenter, plumber, electrician, concrete and block layers, finishers, safety specialists, and other related occupations will be examined.  Improving workplace and computer skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ANIMAL SCIENCE (BSAA) (fulfills lab science university entrance requirement & is an approved science credit)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4  

PREREQUISITE: Students must have successfully completed at least one full year of a science course.

                                                                                               

This course is designed to reinforce and extend students understanding of science by associating scientific principles and concepts with relevant applications in agriculture. Students will examine major phases of animal agriculture and specific biological science concepts that govern management decisions in the animal industry.  Topics of study are in the areas of growth and development of animals – embryology, ethology, nutrition, immunity systems, and processing animal products – preservation, fermentation, and pasteurization.  The course will be valuable preparation for further education and will increase the relevance of science through the applied setting of agriculture by enhancing literacy in science and the scientific process.  Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

                *A modified science fair project is also required.

 

COURSE TITLE:  HORTICULTURE PRODUCTION AND MANAGEMENT

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful Completion of Introduction to the Agriculture Industry.

                                                                                               

This advanced course offers instruction in both the greenhouse production and landscape areas of horticulture.  Units of study include plant identification, greenhouse management, growing greenhouse crops, landscape design, installation, and maintenance, horticulture mechanics, nursery management, and turf production.  Agribusiness units will cover operating a horticultural business, pricing work, advertising, and sales.  Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

 

 

COURSE TITLE:  INTRODUCTION TO THE AGRICULTURE INDUSTRY

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

 PREREQUISITE: None

This orientation course provides an opportunity for students to learn how the agricultural industry is organized; its major components; the economic influence of agriculture at state, national and international levels; and the scope and types of job opportunities in the agricultural field.  Basic concepts in animal science, plant science, soil science, horticulture, natural resources, agribusiness management, and agricultural mechanics, will be presented. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

 

COURSE TITLE: LANDSCAPING/GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful Completion of Introduction to the Agriculture Industry and either Advanced Ag Science or Plant Science (BSAA)

                                                                                               

This advanced course focuses on the landscape, nursery, and turf segments of the horticulture industry.  Units of student instruction include:  identifying landscape plants, designing landscape plans, hardscape construction techniques, and installing landscape plants. This course will also focus on starting plants in the greenhouse and managing the greenhouse business.  Also included are nursery production, turf grass production, and maintenance of existing landscapes.  Agribusiness units will cover calculating prices for work, managing a horticulture business, advertising, and sales. Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  PLANT SCIENCE (BSAA) (fulfills lab science university entrance requirement & is an approved science credit)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4  

PREREQUISITE: Students must have successfully completed at least one full year of a science course.

 

This course is designed to reinforce and extend students understanding of science by associating basic scientific principles and concepts with relevant applications in agriculture. Students will examine major phases of plant growth and management in agriculture and the specific biological science concepts that govern management decisions.  Topics of study are in the areas of initiating plant growth – germination, plant sensory mechanisms, enzyme action, absorption, and managing plant growth – photosynthesis, respiration, translocation, metabolism, and growth regulation.  The course will be valuable preparation for further education and will increase the relevance of science through the applied setting of agriculture by enhancing literacy in science and the scientific process.  Improving computer and workplace skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

                *A modified science fair project is also required.

 

COURSE TITLE:  WELDING I

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (NOT OFFERED 2016-2017)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4                                                                                                  

PREREQUISITE:  Successful Completion of Introduction to the Agriculture Industry.

 

This course will emphasize the development of basic welding and metalworking skills necessary to succeed in agricultural careers in the agricultural metal fabrication industry.  Topics of instruction include: metal identification and properties, metal preparation, use of oxy-acetylene torch, plasma cutting and cutting operations, arc welding, MIG welding, , and project design and construction.  Improving workplace and computer skills will be a focus.  Participation in FFA student organization activities and Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) projects is an integral course component for leadership development, career exploration and reinforcement of academic concepts.

 

COURSE TITLE:  WELDING II

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (NOT OFFERED 2016-2017)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4                                                                                                  

PREREQUISITE:  Successful Completion of Welding I.

 

This course will focus on expanding the use of Arc, MIG and TIG.  This class will be project based with the emphasis on projects in both Arc and MIG.  Topics will include the use of putting different metals together and using multiple types of welding positions. 

 

 

ART

 

COURSE TITLE: ART I - INTRODUCTION TO THE VISUAL ARTS l

CREDITS:  ½ Unit Per Year (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

PREREQUISTE: This course and Intro to Art ll is a requirement for other advanced level studio art classes.

 

Introduction to the Visual Arts is for the student who is interested in art.  From the beginner student to someone who has had some art experience.  This semester will focus on basic drawing skills, pencil, charcoal, pastel, perspective, and proportion studies.  Art history and art appreciation are included in the course. Students are graded on individual ability.

 

COURSE TITLE: ART I - INTRODUCTION TO THE VISUAL ARTS ll

CREDITS:  ½ Unit Per Year (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

PREREQUISTE: This course and Intro to Art l is a requirement for other advanced level studio art classes.

 

Introduction to the Visual Arts is for the student who is interested in art.  From the beginner student to someone who has had some art experience.  Students will experience many forms of art and different mediums such as, painting, watercolor, ceramics, printmaking Etc…   Art history and art appreciation are included in the course.  Students are graded on individual ability

COURSE TITLE:  ADVANCED DRAWING AND PAINTING

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT: 5/4

PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of Introduction to Visual Arts I & II, and two of the following classes: Exploring Art in 2D Design, Watercolor, or Painting/Acrylics. Students must have a grade of “B” or higher in art classes.

This class allows advanced students opportunities to continue developing skills and talents in drawing and painting with traditional and contemporary images. Art History and understanding of contemporary artists and art will be included in the course.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ADVANCED STUDIO I & II

CREDITS: ½ Unit - One Semester Each (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 5/4

PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of Introduction to Visual Arts I & II, and four or more other art classes.  Students must have a “B” or higher in the art classes.

 

Advanced Studio is a course designed to meet the needs of advanced art students who are highly motivated.  The course will be geared to independent projects and the development of an art portfolio.  A minimum of 8 projects executed in various mediums will be required.  Photography, computer work, and a few visits to local art galleries will be required. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  AP ART

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  6/4

PREREQUISITES: Successful completion of Introduction to Visual Arts I & II, and four or more other art classes.  Students must have a “B” or higher in the art classes.

 

AP Art is intended for highly motivated students who are seriously interested in the study of art.  AP Art will reflect three areas of concern: quality, concentration, and breadth of experience.  The major emphasis of the course will be the construction of a student portfolio which will include 20 pieces of quality work produced in the senior year. In addition, there will be an in-depth study of art history and artists. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  CERAMICS/SCULPTURE I & II

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Students must complete Introduction to Visual Arts I & II with a “C” average or higher. 

 

The main focus of this class will give students experiences with ceramic techniques, such as coil, slab, pinch methods, and throwing on the potter’s wheel. Course work will include functional projects (e.g. vases, bowls and trays) as well as sculptural projects. Students will have the opportunity to create sculptures using other mediums such as plaster, wire, and cardboard, but the emphasis will be on ceramics. The class will include the study of other cultures and other artists’ works and techniques.

Ceramics 2: Students wanting to continue on to Ceramics 2, to develop a greater skills and focus must have a grade of “B” or higher in Ceramics 1.

 

COURSE TITLE:  COMPUTER IMAGE AND GRAPHIC DESIGN COMMUNICATION I & II

CREDITS:  ½ Unit – One Semester (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4                                           

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Introduction to Visual Arts I & II, and Exploring Art in 2-D Design with a “B” average or higher.

 

Digital art uses technology and computer software to create images. Students can expect to understand how to make computer generated artwork using software or images captured by a digital camera, and create images appropriate for advertising and commercial art.  This will include art work that clearly defines purpose for commercial arts, advertising, and communications. Students will work with digital images and design concepts.  Students will Learn Program Basics in Adobe Design. Adobe Photoshop CS6 will be used.  Projects will consist of: Poster Design, Magazine layout design, Cd Layout Design, ETC.

Computer Image and Graphic Design Communication II (Spring): Students enrolling in this course must have successfully completed Computer Image and Graphic Design Communication I with a “B” or higher

 

COURSE TITLE: COMPUTER ART

CREDITS: ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Introduction to Visual Art I & II, and Exploring Art in 2 D-Design, or Graphic Design with a “B” or higher.

 

This class will explore problem solving ideas for developing visual concepts that would typically be done in a fine art class, but created through the computer. Students will work with the software program Painter 7 and Adobe Illustrator 8.0 using a Wacom drawing pad. The programs assimilate all art mediums, pencil, pastel, watercolor, pen and ink, etc.  This gives students an opportunity to work with the same computer programs as what the professional graphic artist uses for illustrations.

 

COURSE TITLE:  EXPLORING ART IN 2-D DESIGN

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

PREREQUISITESuccessful completion of Introduction to Visual Arts I & II with a “C” average or higher.

 

This one-semester class will introduce new technique and build on drawing skills learned in Introduction to Visual Arts. Many mediums will be explored through studies in color, ink, printing, and drawings. Students will have graphic design experiences with visual problem solving projects. A focus on the elements and principles will give direction to composition and design. Art history and appreciation will be included in the course

 

COURSE TITLE:  PAINTING

CREDITS: ½ Unit - One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Introduction to Visual Arts I & II with a “C” average or higher.

 

This class will give the opportunity to explore many painting mediums.  Students will learn how to stretch a canvas and experiment with many styles and techniques.   Color theory, composition and design will be reinforced.  Art history and appreciation of other artists and art periods will be included in the course. 

 

COURSE TITLE: PHOTOGRAPHY I

CREDITS: ½ Unit – One Semester (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Introduction to Visual Arts I & II with a “C” average or higher. Students must have access to a digital camera.

 

This class will explore photography past and present.  Student’s main focus will be to create photos with the digital camera.  Photoshop 6.0 software will be used to manipulate their traditional and digital photos. Students will study what makes a good composition and learn how to use a digital camera/ the mechanics of the 35 mm camera. Students will also explore traditional black and white photography and develop their own prints in the dark room.

COURSE TITLE: PHOTOGRAPHY II (DIGITAL IMAGERY)

CREDITS: ½ Unit – One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Introduction to Visual Arts I & II, and Photography I with a “B” or better in Photography I. Students must have access to a digital camera.

 

This class builds on information learned in Photography I, with a focus on digital photography.  Students will learn how to use and to understand their digital camera. By studying contemporary photography students will increase their creative camera and composition skills. In addition students will learn computer skills and the manipulation of images with Photoshop CS6.  Students will also have the opportunity to expand their knowledge of traditional black and white photography. At the end of the semester students will have a portfolio of their work.

Details

BUSINESS/COMPUTER EDUCATION

 

 

COURSE TITLE:  ACCOUNTING I

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

PREREQUISITE: Students must have successfully completed at least one full year of a math course.

 

Accounting I is a skill level course that is of value to all students pursuing a strong background in business, marketing, management, and finance.  This course includes planned learning experiences that develop initial and basic skills used in systematically inputting, classifying, recording, verifying and maintaining numerical data involved in financial and product control records including the paying and receiving of money.  Instruction includes information on keeping financial records, summarizing them for convenient interpretation, and analyzing them to provide assistance to management for decision making.  Accounting computer applications will be integrated throughout the course where applicable.  In addition to stressing basic fundamentals and terminology of accounting, instruction will provide initial understanding of the preparation of budgets and financial reports, operation of related business equipment, and career opportunities in the business field.  Processing employee benefits will also be included.  Practice sets with business papers will be used to emphasize actual business records management.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ACCOUNTING II

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT: 5/4  

PREREQUISITE: Accounting I with a grade of “C” or higher.                                        

 

This course may be offered independently to those students who receive instructor permission.  *Note:  In order to receive the 5/4 weighting, Accounting II cannot be taken as an independent course.   The course describes the accounting profession, its framework, and eleven commonly-accepted accounting concepts. Additionally, the course describes an accounting cycle for a departmentalized merchandising business and automated accounting for a departmentalized merchandising business organized as a corporation.  The course provides students with a knowledge base covering overhead, plant assets, unearned revenue, accrued revenue, financial analysis and managerial and cost accounting for a merchandising business. 

 

Each unit is concluded with an automated accounting problem.  This course will also be reinforced with two automated simulations which will help with overall student knowledge and assessment.  These simulations will place students in the accounting world by asking them to complete an accounting cycle for a merchandising business.

 

 

COURSE TITLE:  COMPUTER APPLICATIONS I

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4   

PREREQUISITE: Students must receive a mark of “C” or higher to take additional computer classes.

 

This course should be taken by incoming freshmen to stay in line with composition.  Students will attain the skills needed to complete related tasks for Composition.  It will implement our word processing program by teaching text enhancement, fonts, margin settings, page numbering, works cited pages, selecting and sorting text, and tab manipulation.  Students will also learn to format tables that may be transferred to and from spreadsheets.  Other areas included in the course will cover columns, page and document borders, merging, graphs, and an introduction to graphics.  Students are encouraged to take Computer Applications II after completing Computer Applications I. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4   

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Computer Applications I with a “C” or higher.

 

This course is a continuation of Computer Applications I and is designed to develop awareness and understanding of the application software and equipment used by employees to perform tasks in business, marketing, management, and finance.  Students will master the remaining components of the Microsoft Office Suite. These components include Advanced Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Publisher.

 

COURSE TITLE:  DESKTOP PUBLISHING I (not offered 2015-2016 school year)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4   

PREREQUISITES: Computer Applications I & Computer Applications II with a “C” or higher in both classes.                                         

 

This class is designed for students who have taken Computer Applications I and II.  In class, students will be responsible for the design and production of the senior video. Students enrolled in the course must possess work-related skills, original thinking, and self-motivation. Students will deal with the public in obtaining documents to produce. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  DESKTOP PUBLISHING II (not offered 2015-2016 school year)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4                                                   

PREREQUISITES: Desktop Publishing I with a “B” or better

 

 

 

 

COURSE TITLE: MARKETING

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4   

PREREQUISITE: Students must have successfully completed at least one full year of an English course.                                

This semester course will introduce students to the business area of Marketing. Students will learn about the various aspects of marketing by examining specific strategies used in entertainment, sports, fashion, and business.  A few of the topics included are:

Sports and Entertainment:                                                                          Fashion:

-   Public Images/Public Relations                                                              -   Fashion Marketing Plans

-   Marketing Plans                                                                                      -   Design and Buying Centers

-   Marketing products and services through sports                                    -   Types of Fashion

-   Marketing individuals, teams and corporations                                       -   Textiles and Fashion

-   College and Amateur Sports                                                                   -   Pricing and Credit

-   Recreation Marketing                                                                              -   Making Fashion

-   Sponsorship and Endorsements                                                             -   Visual Merchandising and Display

 

 

CONSUMER EDUCATION

 

COURSE TITLE:  CONSUMER EDUCATION (Required)                                                                   

CREDITS: ½ Unit - One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4                                                   

 

This course is needed to meet the Consumer Education requirement.  The topics covered in this course will be: money management, the consumer in the economy, saving, investing, and financial services, taxes, housing, consumer credit, the consumer in the marketplace, types of insurance, transportation, and food.  Completion of the job shadowing project is required to pass the class. This course is recommended for students either their junior or senior year.

 

*At this time, the State of Illinois is not providing the option for students to pass the Illinois Consumer Education Proficiency Test to fulfill the Consumer Education requirement.

 

 

DRIVER EDUCATION

 

COURSE TITLE:  DRIVER EDUCATION (Required)

CREDITS: ½ Unit - One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

 

High school students must pass a minimum of eight (8) courses the previous two (2) semesters prior to enrolling in driver education (junior and/or senior high school). Class enrollment and driving order will based on chronological age (9 week classroom instruction for 0.5 credit).

There are two specific goals to accomplish in the Driver Education course. The student must first fulfill the requirement of 30 hours of classroom instruction and pass the state written exam. Once this is achieved, the student must complete six hours of behind-the-wheel driving and pass the state driver’s exam. The charge for the course will be $50 at registration, plus an additional fee paid to the Secretary of State later in the year.

 

ENGLISH

 

COURSE TITLE:  COMPOSITION (Required for all students entering WHS) (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

               

Composition is a semester course required for all incoming students.  This course will cover the writing process in-depth, starting with the basic structure of the paragraph, followed by the structure of the essay.  Students will ultimately organize, develop, create, and revise three essays which will be completed using computer technology.  Throughout the semester various writing skills will be learned and applied to the essays written.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH 101 (NCAA Approved)                                                

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT: 3/4

 

English 101 is a three-weight class that will focus on three primary areas of language: reading literature, writing, and grammar.   Through guided instruction, the students will be able to comprehend and analyze various types of literature: short stories, plays, essays, and/or novels. Students will also gain experience in developing a practical writing style.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH 102 (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year                                                            

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4                                                  

 

English 102 is a four-weight class which will focus on exploring different modes of literature, including short stories, novels, plays, and essays.  Students will learn to critically analyze and interpret literature in their writing and class discussions.  In addition, students will develop and improve their writing skills through instruction on essay writing and basic grammar.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH 103 HONORS (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  5/4

 

English 103 is an accelerated five-weight course which will focus on exploring different modes of literature.  These include short stories, novels, plays, and essays.  Students will learn to critically analyze and interpret literature in their writing and class discussions.  Critical thinking and comprehension are intensified through an in-depth analysis of chosen texts.  The course places an emphasis on writing skills through the development of several essays of analysis, as well as extensive grammar instruction.  *Because of the quantity and complexity of the readings, students will be required to do reading and writing assignments during the summer before their Freshman year.*  Students must maintain at least a B average at the end of the academic year to be placed in English 203 Honors.  Due to the accelerated pace of the class, independent reading and good attendance is also required to remain in the honors program.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH 201 (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT: 3/4                                                   

 

English 201 is a three-weight English class.  Students will focus on the three primary language areas: writing, grammar, and reading literature.  The literary period and/or culture studied will differ from the English 101 course.  Different writing concepts will be introduced as well.  Through guided instruction, the students will be able to comprehend and analyze various types of literature: short stories, plays, essays, and/or novels.  A research paper will be completed in conjunction with the World History class.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH 202 (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

 

English 202 is a four-weight English course that will be taught in conjunction with World History.  Many different modes of world literature will be explored, including short stories, novels, plays, poetry, and essays.  The focus of the course will be on world literature and its connection to the history and development of world cultures.  Students will be instructed to critically analyze and interpret literature in their writing and presentations.  Grammar instruction will also take place in English 202.  Finally, students will be required to complete several assignments with their World History class, including a research paper during the second semester.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH 203 HONORS (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  5/4

 

English 203 is a five-weight class.  The format includes a more in-depth study of the skills taught in English 202 plus the reading of four novels from a suggested list of advanced placement literature.  The four novels must be purchased by the student.  The students will be responsible for a research paper, several essays, essay tests, and presentations.  Critical thinking and comprehension are enhanced through the study of literature.  Five-hundred word essays are written regularly.  *Because of the quantity and complexity of the readings, students will be required to do reading and writing assignments during the summer before their Sophomore year.*  Students must earn a B average to continue to English 303 Honors. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH 301

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  3/4                                                  

 

 

English 301 is a three-weight English class.  The class will focus on the three primary areas of language: writing, grammar, and reading literature.  A different literary period from those studied in 101 and 201 will be covered.  Different writing styles will be emphasized.  Through guided instruction, the students will be able to comprehend and analyze various types of literature: short stories, plays, essays, and/or novels.  Students will do a research paper in conjunction with the United States History class. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH 302 (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

 

English 302 is a four-weight college-bound course open to all juniors.  The course primarily involves a study of American literature from the colonial period to the present.  Genres covered will include essay writing and a research paper written in conjunction with U.S. History.  Grammar instruction will also take place in English 302, especially a preparation for the ACT test.

 

 COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH 303 HONORS  (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  5/4

 

English 303 is a five-weight college-bound course open to juniors who qualify for the Honors Program.  The course primarily involves a study of American literature from the colonial period to the present.  Shakespeare’s Hamlet is covered at the end of the year as a transition piece into AP English 403.  Genres covered will include essays, poetry, short stories, plays, and novels.  Students will be instructed to analyze and interpret literature in their writings and presentations.  In addition, students will develop practical writing skills, including basic essay writing and a research paper written in conjunction with AP History.  *Because of the quantity and complexity of the readings, students will be required to do reading and writing assignments during the summer before their Junior year.*  Grammar instruction will also take place, with a special emphasis on ACT preparation.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH 401

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT: 3/4

 

English 401 is a three-weight elective English course and is open to all non-college bound seniors, who

have successfully completed a junior English class.  The course is strongly recommended for seniors who plan to continue on to higher education but who need additional help developing their English skills. The literature curriculum may be similar to English 402.  The grammar portion will emphasize practical usage of the language.  The composition component will be devoted to the kinds of writing needed to prepare students for the workplace.  Students may be required to purchase selected books. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH 402 (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4                                                  

 

English 402 is a four-weight English class.  The focus of this course is British literature and covers approximately 1,500 years of writing from the Anglo-Saxon period through the twentieth century.  In addition to becoming more effective at analyzing and discussing literature, students will write a variety of essays, including a required research paper.  Students will also study the evolution of the English language, and they will learn a list of vocabulary words recommended for college-bound students.  While grammar/usage is not a significant part of the course in terms of time commitment, there is review of the most troublesome grammar-usage rules. 

 

 

COURSE TITLE:  AP ENGLISH (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year                                                            

COURSE WEIGHT:  6/4

 

AP English is a six-weight English class.  The primary objective of this class is to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement test in English Literature, which is usually administered in early May.  The readings for the course are focused on British literature and are frequently mixed with contemporary interpretations of classic works.  There will be both in-class impromptu essays and out-of-class essays; students will also write a required research paper.  The papers, including the research paper, will be concerned primarily with literary analysis. Students will also study the evolution of the English language, and they will learn a list of vocabulary words recommended for college-bound students.  While grammar-usage is not a significant part of the course in terms of time commitment, there is review of the most troublesome grammar/usage rules. *Because of the quantity and complexity of the readings and the early date of the AP exam, students will be required to do reading and writing assignments during the summer before their senior year. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  JOURNALISM (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

PREREQUISITE: Students must have successfully completed at least one full year of an English course. Acceptance into the Journalism class will be based upon an application procedure.

 

Students will be working on all aspects of yearbook design and journalism.

Design:                 Students will design layouts using advanced desktop publishing techniques.  They will also learn the methods of sound page design.

Photographs:     Students will learn to set up shots and practice taking pictures to evaluate photographs and crop photos.  Students will also be introduced to digital photography and computer photo enhancement software.

Journalism:         Students will learn proper interviewing techniques, develop copy for the yearbook and news articles, and understand the role of journalism in society.

 

COURSE TITLE:  SPEECH (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  ½  Unit - One Semester (Fall & Spring)                                             

COURSE WEIGHT:  5/4

PREREQUISITE: Students must have successfully completed at least two full years of an English course.

 

Students present a variety of speeches throughout the one-semester course.  One of the main objectives of the course is to help students manage and overcome their natural stage fright.  They begin with very simple, non-threatening presentations (e.g. Show-and-Tell, Telling a Joke).  From there the speaking assignments become increasingly complex. They include informative speeches, a persuasive speech and a debate.  We study various techniques of public speaking, including the most effective use of rhetorical devices.  Students also practice using visual aids.  In addition, research techniques, especially use of electronic media, are studied and enhanced.  Chapters in the textbook are used to provide background information and terminology for each speaking experience.  While various forms of assessment are used, the majority of students’ grades are based on their oral presentations (i.e., speeches).  A communications (speech) class is often required as a general education requirement in a college program.

Details

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCES

 

COURSE TITLE:  CHILD DEVELOPMENT I

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Orientation to Family & Consumer Science is strongly recommended.

 

This course is designed to help students think through responsibilities, satisfactions and stresses of parenthood and prenatal development and care.  Stress prevention and management and the work of community agencies that help parents deal with various types of parenting situations are emphasized. Students will have the opportunity to receive some experience working with small children.

 

Special attention is given to the needs of teenage parents and to the importance of readiness for parenthood.

 

COURSE TITLE:  CHILD DEVELOPMENT II

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Child Development I.

 

The development of children is studied from infancy through the preschool stage.  Emphasis is placed on increased understanding of children and the development of basic skills in child care.  Students will receive some laboratory experiences with children.

 

COURSE TITLE:  FASHION TEXTILES I

CREDITS:   ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Orientation to Family & Consumer Science.

 

This is a semester course to explain basic clothing construction with emphasis on being able to read pattern instructions and correctly use sewing machines and tools.  Evaluation of ready-made garments, textiles, and fashion merchandising are also discussed.  In this course, students will learn some of the current technology used in the sewing industry.

 

COURSE TITLE:  FASHION TECHNOLOGY

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Fashion Textiles I.

 

Students must have successfully completed Fashion Textiles I prior to enrollment.  The course will include a more advanced level of clothing construction.  Students will have the opportunity to construct projects using current technology in the sewing industry. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  FOODS AND NUTRITION I

CREDITS:  ½  Unit - One Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Orientation to Family & Consumer Science is strongly recommended.

 

 

Students should develop an accurate knowledge of applied nutrition and an understanding of basic principles of food preparation.  They will develop skills in using equipment to produce simple, nutritious and attractively served meals and snacks.  Emphasis is placed on developing management techniques to aid in household responsibilities, food service occupations and other types of employment.  Nutrition, food buying, safety, and sanitation will also be stressed.

 

COURSE TITLE:  FOODS AND NUTRITION II

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Foods & Nutrition I.

 

This semester course is designed as a continuation of Foods & Nutrition I.  It will be directed toward additional cooking skills and techniques beyond the basic food preparation skills.  In addition, the importance of nutrition when making food choices, and when buying and preparing food is enhanced. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  HOUSING AND INTERIOR DECORATING
CREDITS:  ½ Unit – One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

 

Various types of housing, study of efficient house plans and traffic patterns are included in this course.  The effect of different family situations and house financing also are examined.  The ability to express yourself in your home is studied.  Through the study of furniture styles, arrangements and floor plans, the student acquires the ability to successfully plan a room or home.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ADULT LIVING

CREDITS:  ½ Unit – One Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

 

This course is designed to assist individuals and families in achieving life satisfaction through responsible participation as adults in the home, community, and workplace.  Emphasis is placed on the development of prevention strategies, which will assist individuals in terms of their identified goals and values.  The course content includes the following duty areas:  developing short and long range goals, demonstrating goal setting and decision-making skills, evaluating and adapting basic need to assume roles and responsibilities, developing effective relationships to promote communication with others, and evaluating family and career changes as to its impact on individuals.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ORIENTATION TO FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE (OFCS)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

 

This is a composite course introducing the student to the basic subject matter in six areas: (1) clothing and textiles, (2) resource management, (3) foods and nutrition, (4) housing, home furnishings and equipment, (5) human development and family relationships and (6) introduction to the world of work.  Learning experiences will enable students to understand themselves, their roles in today’s society, life skills, and other family and consumer science related careers.

 

 

 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE

 

COURSE TITLE:  FRENCH I (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

 

French I is a full-year course and is open to any high school student who wishes to learn French as a communication tool or to enhance knowledge and cultural understanding.  The student will begin to develop the four language skills: speaking, reading, writing, and listening comprehension.  Context in which the language is presented includes relevant situations for teenagers and travelers.  Students will be exposed to the rich culture and history of France and other French-speaking cultures.  Students will learn to express themselves with basic vocabulary and structure.  A foreign language is often required for admission to and/or graduation from a college program. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  FRENCH II (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

PREREQUISITE: French I with a grade of “C” or better.

 

This course is a continuation of the development and refinement of skills of French I on a more advanced level.  The student will learn to communicate more complex ideas, improve pronunciation, and learn to speak in the past tenses.  Improvement in comprehension and production of the language is a key part of the second year. Most college programs requiring a foreign language suggest at least two years of one foreign language. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  FRENCH III (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  5/4

PREREQUISITE: French II with a grade of “C” or better.

 

This course is a continuation of the development of the skills of language acquisition.  More emphasis will be placed on expressing complex ideas in the target language, through the study of literature and culture.  Literacy skills of reading and writing will be on a more advanced level.  Any student successfully completing French II is encouraged to add a third year of language to his/her transcript and accomplishments.

 

COURSE TITLE:  FRENCH IV (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  5/4

PREREQUISITE: French III with a grade of “C” or better.

 

This course is a continuation of the development of the four basic communication skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Emphasis will be placed on expressing complex ideas in the target language and practical usage of the language.  Using advanced language skills, students will be exposed to more cultural contexts and will gain a better understanding of the culture through the language, literature, fine arts, media, history and geography.  Literacy skills of reading and writing will be on a more advanced level.  Any student successfully completing French III is encouraged to add a fourth year of language to his/her transcript and accomplishments.

 

COURSE TITLE:  SPANISH I (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

 

Spanish I is a full-year course and is open to any high school student who wishes to use Spanish as a means of communication, both oral and written.  The student will begin to develop the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, by learning the sound system of the language, basic vocabulary for everyday use, basic sentence structure, etc.  The student will practice understanding and speaking in Spanish.   Spanish I includes topics relating to friendship, travel, family, shopping, weather, sports, clothes, and restaurants.  In addition to the textbook, students will explore the Spanish language and culture through the use of taped materials, music, games, and videos.  A foreign language is often required for admission and/or graduation from a college. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  SPANISH II (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

PREREQUISITE: Spanish I with a grade of “C” or better.

 

This course is a continuation of the studies and activities of Spanish I on a more advanced level, including using past tenses.  Vocabulary is presented in greater volume, and sentence patterns are more complex.  The students will create original sentences and read aloud with improved pronunciation.  They should be able to comprehend spoken and written Spanish at the second year level.  Most colleges requiring a foreign language for admission suggest at least two years of one foreign language. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  SPANISH III (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT: 5/4

PREREQUISITE: Spanish II with a grade of “C” or better.

 

This course is a continuation of the studies and activities of Spanish I and II on an even more advanced level.  Students will use the present, past, future, conditional, and some compound tenses.  Advanced grammar concepts will be applied to original writing and oration.  Students will study a novelette during the third quarter.  Fourth quarter will include a unit on famous Spanish painters.  

 

 

 

COURSE TITLE:  SPANISH IV (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  5/4

PREREQUISITE: Spanish III with a grade of “C” or better.

 

This course is a continuation of the studies and activities of Spanish III.  Students will listen to real-life situations, understand the main idea and some details, and provide an appropriate written, oral, or physical response.  They will attempt to speak Spanish spontaneously and with confidence, expressing and supporting their opinions and preferences.  Material such as Don Quixote will be read with the goal of interpreting main ideas and the sequence of events.  The focus will be upon listening comprehension and spontaneous oration in Spanish.

 

HEALTH EDUCATION

 

COURSE TITLE:  HEALTH EDUCATION (Required)

CREDITS: ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall & Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

 

Health is a state requirement for all students in Illinois.  This course is an introduction to mental and physical health, stress, weight management, preventative medicine, safety, alcohol, tobacco, illegal drugs, human sexuality, sexually transmitted diseases, teen suicide prevention, HIV and AIDS.  Students will be required to keep a binder of their class work. 

 

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

(*Industrial Technology courses have been adapted and are now offered through the Ag-Science Department. Please see pg. 9-11 for updated course information.)

 

COURSE TITLE: ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Introduction to Drafting

 

Students will be exposed to ideas, terminology, concepts, and skills used in the modern architecture industry.  Units will include: history of architecture, architectural law, floor plans, AutoCAD software use, elevations, plot plans, electrical plans, plumbing plans, roof plans, building design, and dream home creation/modeling.  Students will use modern AutoCAD software to create drawings and solve architectural problems.

 

COURSE TITLE:  BUILDING TRADES

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4                                                                                      

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Woodworking I

 

Students will be exposed to ideas, terminology, concepts, and skills associated with the modern construction industry.  Units will include: planning, cost estimation, business principles, shop and site safety, framing, electrical, plumbing, flooring/walls, roofing, and finish carpentry.  They will build a structure each year (school or private need), emphasizing the skills and concepts learned throughout the course. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  HOME MAINTENANCE (Not offered 2015-2016)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4                                                  

 

The focus of this class is to instruct the average student the basics of home maintenance. Topics in this course focus around basic home wiring, basic plumbing, dry walling, roofing, etc. The course intent is broad and gives the individual the opportunity to learn the basics of home maintenance and construction. Student's will complete a series of projects but may be required to bring in/come up with projects to on which to work/fix/improve. In a limited amount of time, the student will learn how to do household repairs using the tools demonstrated to them.

 

  

COURSE TITLE:  INTRODUCTION TO DRAFTING

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

 

Students will be exposed to ideas, terminology, concepts, and skills associated with the modern drafting/engineering industry.  Units will include drawing types, multi-view drawings, isometric drawings, AutoCAD skills, engineering process, and using drafting to solve problems (bridge design/testing).  Students will use modern AutoCAD software to create drawings throughout the course, in turn learning new skills and techniques.  Students will begin their portfolio in the course.

 

COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY

CREDITS: ½ Unit – One Semester (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

 

Students will be exposed to multiple facets of technology and industry including: history of technology, manufacturing, transportation, energy, electrical theory, material science, communication, and construction.  Students will learn key terms and ideas associated with each of the disciplines to help them further decide what is of interest to them when deciding on future coursework. 

 

COURSE TITLE: PRE-ENGINEERING I

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Introduction to Drafting

Students will be exposed to more complex ideas, terminology, concepts and skills associated with the modern general drafting/engineering industry.  Units will include mechanical engineering, civil engineering, manufacturing engineering, electrical engineering (schematics/Ohm’s Law), solving for missing views, 3-D drawings, material properties, and careers.  Student will use modern AutoCAD software as a problem solving venue to create drawings. 

 

COURSE TITLE: PRE-ENGINEERING II

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Pre-Engineering I

 

Students will be exposed to more complex ideas, terminology, concepts and skills associated with the modern general drafting/engineering industry.  Units will be based on laws of motion, material science/testing, manufacturing systems, product development, product marketing, advanced multi-view/isometric drawings, 3-dimensional drawings, and cross-sectional/detailed drawings.  Student will use modern AutoCAD software to create drawings throughout the course, taking knowledge gained in each of the academic units to solve problems using the engineering process.  Students will use basic AutoCAD software with Revit and Inventor.   

                *Current students that were ready to take Computer Drafting III and IV are eligible to take Pre-Engineering II

 

COURSE TITLE:  WOODWORKING I

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

 

Students are oriented to woodworking processes, applications, and concepts used in the past and in current industry. They continue with units and topics such as safety, measuring systems, materials, resources, environmental impacts, proper use of hand tools including proper safe operation of woodworking machines, and the final preparation of a product involving sanding and staining. Students will gain experience by completing an assigned beginner’s woodworking project(s) (they can take home) using the skills they have been taught. 50% Classroom and 50% Lab. Students will pay a fee to cover the cost of projects.

 

COURSE TITLE:  WOODWORKING II

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion of Woodworking I with a grade of “C” or better.

 

This course is step two in the sequence of the Woodworking classes. It is designed to further instruct the student in the area of woodworking. The intent is to provide additional techniques beyond an introductory level course and to build upon those skills learned previously. In this class students will develop a more in depth understanding of the proper use of power tools through proper instruction and safety demonstrations/tests. Students will study the different career opportunities involved in woodworking, lumber identification, planning, layout, and the final preparation of a product involving sanding and staining. Classroom instruction will be reinforced through the completion of assigned projects in the woodworking lab/shop. If a student has a personal project they would like to complete it can be done after the required projects are done at their own cost (time permitting). Students will pay a fee to cover the cost of projects.

50% Classroom and 50% Lab.

 

Details

MATHEMATICS

 

Students may take only one math course per year unless there is written consent from a math instructor to take an additional course.

 

ALGEBRA COURSES

 

COURSE TITLE:  ALGEBRA 101

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  3/4

 

The structure and methods of mathematics will be studied with emphasis on problem solving with real numbers and will include the use of variables in equations, inequalities and expressions.  Application of these skills is emphasized in the solution of word problems. The topics are covered at a slower pace than Algebra 102. 

 

COURSE TITLE: ALGEBRA 201

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT: 3/4

 

This course is a full-year course and is open to students who have completed Algebra 101 and Geometry 101.  This course contains additional material in all areas of algebra.  New material consists of systems of equations, quadratic equations, and polynomial functions.  The topics are covered at a slower pace than Algebra 202.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ALGEBRA 102 (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

 

This is a course in modern algebra for the student who is well based in the fundamental operations of arithmetic and wishes a deeper understanding of the algebra method.  The structure and methods of mathematics will be studied with emphasis on problem solving with real numbers and will include the use of variables in equations, inequalities and expressions.  Application of these skills is emphasized in the solution of word problems.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ALGEBRA 103 HONORS (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

 

Algebra 103 Honors is a full-year course, open to freshmen who have been recommended for the course. Students must have either completed Algebra 1 as an 8th grader or excelled in Pre-Algebra A as an 8th grader.

 

Algebra 103 Honors is a more rigorous course than Algebra 102. It covers more topics in greater depth, and it moves at an accelerated pace. The course is designed to challenge and prepare students to potentially enter the honors track for math classes offered in subsequent years at the high school. With teacher recommendation, Algebra 103 Honors students may enter Geometry 103 (an honors course) rather than Geometry 102 as sophomores.

 

Students who earn A’s every quarter in Algebra 103 Honors and maintain an A for each semester’s average will be given the option to double up the following year taking both Algebra 203 Honors and Geometry 103 (both honors courses) simultaneously.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ALGEBRA 202 (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITES:  Successful completion of Algebra 102 and Geometry.

 

Algebra 202 is a full-year course and is open to students who have completed Algebra 102 and Geometry.  This course contains additional material in all areas of algebra.  Specifically, new material consists of polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and rational functions, along with a focus on complex numbers. Applications of these topics will also be examined in this course. 

COURSE TITLE:  ALGEBRA 203 Honors (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISITES:  Geometry 103 with a “B” average or higher.

 

Algebra 203 Honors is a more rigorous course than Algebra 202.  Many topics not included in the Algebra 202 curriculum will be covered in this course.  This course moves at a fast pace and demands a strong work ethic.  Algebra 203 Honors prepares students for the honors track Pre-Calculus course. 

 

 

CALCULUS COURSES

 

COURSE TITLE:  PRE-CALC (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE:  Successful completion of Algebra 102, Geometry 102, and Algebra 202.

Pre-Calc is a full-year course and is open to students who have completed Algebra 102, Geometry 102, and Algebra 202.  The first semester covers a variety of topics not previously taught: rational functions, logarithmic functions, probability, matrices, and analytical geometry.  The second semester consists of trigonometry including circular and inverse functions, graphing trig functions and verifying identities.  This course is the coordination of all arithmetic and mathematics which the student has had as it is applied to new and advanced ideas.  No graphing calculators are allowed.

 

COURSE TITLE:  PRE-CALC HONORS (NCAA Approved)
CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year
COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISITE:  Algebra 203 Honors with a “B” average or higher

Pre-Calc Honors covers all topics from Pre-Calc at a faster pace. Additional topics not covered in Pre-Calc will include sequences, series, and limits. No graphing calculators are allowed. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  AP CALC (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   6/4

PREREQUISTE: Pre-Calc Honors with a grade of “B” or higher.

 

AP Calc is a full-year course.  This course follows the recommendations of the committee on Mathematics of the Advanced Placement Program.

 

Topics covered will be: Limits, derivatives, applications of the derivative, basic integration and anti-derivatives, applications of the derivative, basic integration and anti-derivatives, applications of the integral, calculus with logarithmic and exponential functions, advanced integration techniques such as integration by parts.Anystudent in the course will have the option of taking the AP test in May.   Teacher will specify which type of graphing calculators the students can use.  

 

GEOMETRY COURSES

 

COURSE TITLE:  GEOMETRY 101 (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  3/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Algebra 101.

 

Geometry 101 is a full-year course and is open to students who have completed Algebra 101. The basic ideas, concepts and relationships of geometry are covered in this course. Formal proof and deductive reasoning are de-emphasized. The pace is slower, with concepts being presented in a variety of methods to accommodate different learning styles and strengths.

This course is not recommended for students who are college bound in a mathematically related field. The students will benefit from an introduction to concepts that they will need for college entrance exams.

 

COURSE TITLE:  GEOMETRY 102 (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Algebra 102.

 

Geometry is a full-year course and is open to any student who has successfully completed Algebra 102.  Deductive reasoning and formal proof are the emphasis of first semester.  Geometric concepts and relationships are taught and emphasized through the rigorous use of definitions, theorems, and postulates.  Problems go beyond memorization of facts, to the demonstration of application and synthesis.  Creative thinking and problem-solving skills are enhanced.  Strong algebraic background is needed, as problem-solving requires both the understanding of new geometry ideas and application of algebra skills. 

 

The course is necessary for all students planning to continue the study of mathematics in high school.  College-bound students will benefit from the demands of the course, as it prepares them for success in testing as well as success in future math courses. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  GEOMETRY 103 HONORS (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

 

This full-year course is open to freshmen who have successfully completed Algebra 102 and have been recommended by their teacher for advanced placement.  Some sophomores who have excelled in Algebra 103 Honors may be recommended for this course as well. 

 

The goals of this course include challenging students to think “outside the box,” to develop higher-level reasoning and creative problem-solving skills.  The basic constructs of Geometry will be covered, but at an accelerated pace.  Projects will be offered that enhance learning of course concepts.  

 

OTHER MATH COURSES

 

COURSE TITLE:  MATHEMATICS 4 (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISTE: Successful completion of Pre Calc  or Pre Calc Honors.

 

This course is open to students who have completed Pre Calc but are not ready to take calculus.  It will be similar to the college algebra class students will take in college.  The students review algebra topics, work on exponential and log functions, trig, matrices and determinates, sequencing and series, probability, Conic sections, and intro to calculus terms such as derivatives and limits.

 

COURSE TITLE:  TRANSITIONAL MATH

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of Algebra 1 and Geometry.

This math class is designed for those students who have completed Algebra 1 and a Geometry class but do not have an adequate mastery of these subjects to succeed in Algebra 202 or Pre-Calculus. In this course, Algebra and Geometry are approached through numerical computations and graphical analysis in concrete problem settings. The mathematical ideas of the course are developed through a large collection of problems which are approached first arithmetically, then geometrically with graphic representation and solution. Finally, problems are represented and solved algebraically. If students are going on to college, this would be a good class to take to keep their math skills sharp.

 

MUSIC

 

COURSE TITLE:  BAND

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion of the Williamsville Junior High Band (Grades 6-8), or transferring from another established high school band program.  In the event a student has not fully completed the junior high prerequisite, a performance test measuring the students reading and performing abilities will be administered. When the student passes such tests, final consideration to the group will be at the director’s (teacher’s) discretion.

Course Objectives:

1.            Provide students, through performance on an instrument, some educational aesthetic value and enjoyment of music.

2.            Provide performing music for concerts, contests, and competitions throughout the school year and summer.  This includes performances at all WHS home Varsity Boys Basketball and Football games.

3.            Provide students the opportunity to learn how to perform solo and ensemble band literature for IHSA State Contest and public performance settings.

4.            Provide students the opportunity to develop music skills to use later in life after their high school years.

 

Means of Achieving Course Objectives:

1.            Students provide their own instruments; music is distributed by the teacher.

2.            Students are required to pay for parts of a summer band uniform (shirt and shorts to be worn for marching).

3.            Students are graded on attendance and evaluated on assignments pertaining to the music performance areas being studied.

4.            Students are also administered written semester exams as well as performance tests on their respective individual instruments.

 

Band Class Requirements:

1.            Upon entry into the course each year, students will receive a WHS band manual that describes and defines all the regulations pertaining to WHS Band activities.

2.            Participation and attendance at all concerts, contests, performances, and graduation ceremonies determine part of the final course grade.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ACOUSTIC GUITAR I-(NOT OFFERED 2015-2016)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

 

Beginning guitar class is limited to a maximum of 10 students per semester.  Students MUST HAVE THEIR OWN ACOUSTIC GUITAR in order to participate in this class.  Basic instruction on the six strings includes note naming, scales, chords in several positions, bar chords, power chords, rock and jazz chord playing, reading standard music, reading tablature, and melodic exercises (single note melodies).  Each student must perform, at the end of the semester, a recital to receive final grade and credit in this course.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ACOUSTIC GUITAR 2-(NOT OFFERED 2015-2016)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful Completion of Acoustic guitar I.

 

Continues from Acoustic Guitar Ito more intermediate study of guitar, history of guitars (electric and acoustic), group practice and performance(s) with class members.  We will study the 20th and 21st Century Guitar Music and Masters of Guitar Performance.  Class will also teach how to care for your instrument, learning how to re-string your guitar, neck adjustments, finger fret board set-ups, and group lab work. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  MIXED CHOIR

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year 

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4    

 

Mixed Choir is a full year course; students must receive permission of the Building Principal to enroll in only one semester.

 

Mixed Choir is open to male students and sophomore through senior females.  Students will work to develop individual singing skills, multiple part singing, sight reading and small ensemble singing both accompanied and a cappella.    Music history, foreign language diction, poetry, and multicultural studies are all topics that will be addressed as they relate to the musical selections studied.  Sound and video technology are used for both classroom and performance assessment tools.  Students will perform in three concerts as well as compete at IHSA Organizational Contest.  Students will also have the opportunity to participate in the IMEA Festivals and IHSA Solo & Ensemble Contest.

 

COURSE TITLE:  JAZZ BAND ENSEMBLE

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   (1st & 2nd year 4/4, 3rd & 4th year 5/4)

PREREQUISITE: Any student considering this class must also enroll in the WHS Band or Chorus.  Admission to this class is by audition.

 

This is a full-year zero hour early bird course. The fall semester is designed to study and perform jazz, and jazz improvisation, and also to prepare students for auditioning in the IMEA All-District Jazz Festival each year in November.  Students will study and perform big band jazz, jazz/rock music, and combo fusion music from the 20th century.  The fall semester is limited to basic jazz training. The spring semester is designed to continue the fall curriculum while expanding and escalating the improvisational skills on each student’s instrument(s). Theory will be added for use in jazz improvisation as well as ensemble playing.  The spring semester jazz band will perform several concerts and play for events, as well as participate in contest(s). 

 

COURSE TITLE:  MADRIGALS

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT:   (1st & 2nd year 4/4, 3rd & 4th year 5/4)

 

Admission to this class is by audition.

 

Madrigals is a fall semester, daily class that meets during zero hour (early bird).  Auditions for the Madrigal singers will be near the end of spring semester for all 8th grade through junior students who are interested in Madrigals for the following fall semester.  Madrigals will acquaint the singer with a cappella Madrigal and Renaissance music as well as the style of instrumentation used during that period.  It will also encourage further study of the dress, ceremonies, and history of the period before, during, and after the Renaissance.  The Madrigal class will begin immediately preparing a repertoire for a holiday performance schedule.  Performances will include school and community concerts, occasional workshops, festivals, and contests.  The class will culminate with a major production of a Madrigal Dinner/Tea for our school and community.  Grades are determined by class and concert participation and by a semester exam.  A WHS Madrigal Handbook is distributed to aid the students in understanding expectations and policy.

 

COURSE TITLE:  MUSIC THEORY AND COMPOSITION

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

 

Music Theory 1 is a one-semester course for students who wish to gain a better understanding of the language of music.  Beginning with the fundamentals of music, students are equipped to practice music reading and writing skills.  Listening skills are also developed through ear training exercises.  Students will supplement their studies using music theory and music notation software programs.

 

An extension of Music Theory (Music Theory 2) will be offered to students who successfully complete Music Theory 1. Music Theory 2 is also a one-semester course. Students will continue to study how music is constructed and will progress to more advanced topics within the areas of harmonic analysis, composition, ear training, and sight-reading.  Students will supplement their studies using music notation software.

 

Music Theory 3 & 4 are semester courses open to advanced music students that have successfully completed Music Theory 1 & 2 with a B average or higher. Beginning with a review of the fundamentals of music, students will continue to further their skills in analysis and composition.  Two and four-part harmonizations along with a thorough study of melody, rhythm, and texture are included.  Musical compositions and a historical perspective are taught in relation to the topics studied.  Students will continue to develop both ear training and sight-reading skills.  Upon completion of Music Theory 4, students will be well prepared to study music at the college level.

 

COURSE TITLE:  PIANO LAB

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

 

Piano Lab is a semester long applied music course open to all students - from beginners with little or no musical experience to advanced students with private lesson experience.  Students in the class will progress at their own rates while using similar reading and technical methods.  All students will learn to play the piano to an accomplished level relative to their prior knowledge of the instrument.  Students will learn music reading and theory as they study scales, technical exercises, and a varied repertoire of solo literature.  Students will gain confidence in playing alone and with others.  Advanced students may also study and be given opportunities to accompany/perform for contests, concerts and performances.  Advanced students may also have the opportunity to develop their own piano instruction skills through guided practice in order to enable them to begin teaching private lessons.  All piano lab students will end the semester with a recital open to the public. Students may take Piano Lab one or two semesters each year and still receive credit towards graduation.

 

COURSE TITLE:  TREBLE CHOIR

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

 

Treble Choir is a full year course; students must receive permission of the Building Principal to enroll in only one semester.

 

Treble Choir is open to female voices only.  Students will work to develop individual singing skills, multiple part singing, sight reading and small ensemble singing both accompanied and a cappella.  Treble Choir may be combined with a section of Bass Choir to perform mixed choir repertoire.  Treble Choir may also remain an all-female ensemble that performs treble choir repertoire of a wide variety of styles from traditional to popular.  Music history, foreign language diction, poetry, and multicultural studies are all topics that will be addressed as they relate to the musical selections studied.  Sound and video technology are used for both classroom and performance assessment tools.  Students will perform in three concerts as well as compete at IHSA Organizational Contest.  Students will also have the opportunity to participate in the IMEA Festivals and IHSA Solo & Ensemble Contest.

 

COURSE TITLE:  VOCAL JAZZ

CREDITS: ½ Unit - One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:  (1st & 2nd year 4/4, 3rd & 4th year 5/4)

 

Admission to this class is by audition.

 

 

Vocal Jazz is an auditioned spring semester, daily class that meets during zero hour (early bird).  Auditions for Vocal Jazz will be near the end of fall semester of the same year for students from grades 9-12.  Students in the Vocal Jazz ensemble will study contemporary music in a variety of styles including but not limited to swing, ballads, funk, Latin, pop, and blues.  Students will perform both a cappella and accompanied by jazz combo/band.  Students will perform in two concerts and compete in two contests.  Additional performances and clinics may be added to the schedule.

 

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

COURSE TITLE:  PHYSICAL EDUCATION

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

 

All students at Williamsville High School must be enrolled in P.E. for every semester that they are enrolled in high school (up to four years) with the exception of juniors and seniors who qualify for an athletic waiver, a college admission waiver, local graduation waiver, or marching band waiver.  Students receive academic credit for every semester that P.E. is passed, and they receive academic credit when Health Education is passed.  A student may enroll in a minimum of one P.E. course per semester.  Physical Education objectives are as follows:       

1.            To develop strength, endurance, stamina, and coordination.

2.            To develop acceptable values and perception of self and others by providing individual and team activities.

3.            To develop a knowledge of the rules and skills of seasonal and leisure-time sports.

4.            To develop a sense of value for sports - during the teenage and adult years - whether one is a participant or a spectator.

5.            To build up motor skills and to secure physical endurance.

 

COURSE TITLE: PHYSICAL EDUCATION- FITNESS

CREDITS: 1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT: 4/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion of a minimum of one year of P.E. *All physical education rules apply to the physical education-fitness course.

 

Personal Fitness class will provide an opportunity for development of strength and conditioning for various sports and fitness related activities.  Free weights, exercise machines and conditioning activities will be incorporated to promote improvement in strength, endurance, balance, agility, and speed.  Proper technique, safety precautions and proper application of the Principles of Training will be emphasized.  A plan to achieve goals will be developed and implemented during this course. Physical Fitness objectives are as follows:

 

  1. Demonstrate knowledge, proper technique and safety precautions during activity.
  2. Improve Core Strength.
  3. Strive for balanced muscular development.
  4. Improve work capacity.
  5. Make conditioning a part of their daily routine.

 

COURSE TITLE:  WEIGHT TRAINING AND CONDITIONING

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion of a minimum of one year of P.E. *All physical education rules apply to the weight training and conditioning class.

 

This course focuses on various types of physical conditioning, with an emphasis on weight training.  Proper techniques and safety rules will be taught.  Daily participation is vital to the successful completion of this course.  The following grading system is used; 50% daily participation, 25% increase quarter max lifts and 25% daily record sheets.  Enrollment in this course is limited. 

Details

SCIENCE

 

COURSE TITLE:  ASTRONOMY (NOT OFFERED 2015-2016)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion of Biology and completion of or current enrollment in Algebra 202.

 

 

Astronomy is a one-semester course open to juniors and seniors who have completed Biology.  Topics include a historical perspective of the oldest science, celestial mechanics, instrumentation and research techniques, solar system objects, stellar evolution, galaxies, and cosmology.  Please note that students may be expected to attend occasional evening sessions.

 

COURSE TITLE:  BIOLOGY I (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Introduction to Chemistry & Physical Science

 

Biology I is a full year science course using laboratory experimentation and relevant current and historical events to investigate the science of living things.  Course topics include biochemistry, metabolism, evolution, ecology, genetics, and a survey of the six-kingdom system of classification.  This course may be taken concurrently with Chemistry with permission of instructor.

*Freshman students who have excelled in 8th grade science with straight A’s and have teacher recommendation may be given the option to double up and take Introduction to Chemistry & Physical Science and Biology I.

 

COURSE TITLE:  AP BIOLOGY (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   6/4

PREREQUISITES: Completion of Biology and Honors Chemistry with a "B" or above in each course. Students must also have completed or are concurrently enrolled in Human Anatomy and Physiology.

AP Biology is equivalent to a two-semester introductory college biology course taken by students majoring in a biological science. AP Biology differs from regular high school biology through the use of inquiry-based learning, a college-level text, a greater range and depth of topics covered, a faster pace of instruction, more sophisticated lab work, and more time and effort required of students in order to succeed in the course. The course homework is time intensive. This course has been authorized by the College Board as meeting the requirements for AP Biology.

Students who are genuinely interested in deepening their understanding of the principles of biological science, pursuing a career in the biological sciences or medical fields are especially advised to take AP Biology in high school. Students are expected to read and outline each chapter, prepare laboratory reports, complete all assigned work on time, and engage in discussions, debates, independent research, group activities and labs.

 Upon successful completion of the course, students will:

  • Develop a conceptual framework for modern biology;
  • Develop an appreciation of science as a process;
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply scientific skills and follow scientific processes;
  • Develop collaborative relationships with other AP Biology students;
  • Pass the AP Biology exam with a score of 3 or better

 

COURSE TITLE:  CHEMISTRY I (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITES: Completion of Intro to Chemistry & Physical Science, completion or current enrollment in Biology I and Algebra 102 or higher.  

 

This one year course is designed to introduce the disciplines of chemistry. Chemistry is a laboratory and math based course designed to give an overview of chemistry and its applications. This course will prepare students for more advanced science courses. Topics covered will include: atomic structure and theory, periodic properties, chemical equations and formulas, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gases, solutions, acid base chemistry, organic and petroleum-based chemistry, and nuclear chemistry will be covered.

COURSE TITLE:  CHEMISTRY II (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISITES: Completion of Chemistry I with a grade of “B” or higher and completion of Algebra 202 or higher.

 

Chemistry II is a rigorous course designed to prepare students for a general chemistry curriculum at the college level. The course will include a general review of atomic structure, nomenclature, stoichiometry, electronic structure and chemical bonding. The course will focus on equilibrium, rate laws, electrochemistry, thermochemistry and thermodynamics. The course is a lab intensive course that will cover several of the advanced placement chemistry labs. Students will be allowed to take the AP Chemistry exam in the spring that will include a formal review in the 4th quarter to prepare for the test.

 

COURSE TITLE:  HONORS CHEMISTRY (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISITES:  “C” or higher in Intro to Chemistry & Physical Science, completion of Algebra 102 or Honors Algebra 103 and teacher recommendation.  

 

Honors Chemistry is designed as a laboratory course intended for those students who plan additional work in science.  This course will cover basic theories of chemistry, with emphasis on developing laboratory and math skills.  The laboratory component will be extensive with emphasis on precision and accuracy of measurement and chemical laboratory techniques. Lab write ups and data analysis are key skills with content to prepare students for AP Biology and Chemistry II.

 

COURSE TITLE:  INTEGRATED SCIENCE (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  3/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion of Life Science and completion or concurrent enrollment in Algebra 101.

 

This is full year course designed to give students a foundation in the many different physical sciences and serve as a basis for further studies in chemistry and physics. The course has four components: space science, chemistry, physics, and earth science. Labs and activities will be emphasized as well as scientific problem solving strategies to prepare the students for future course work.

 

COURSE TITLE:  GEOLOGY (NOT OFFERED 2015-2016)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion of Life Science or Introduction to Chemistry and Physical Science.

 

A one semester course, Geology is the study of the composition of the earth.  Using plate tectonic theory as a method of understanding the processes at work on our planet, this course will focus on the forces that can result in earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building and erosion as well as offer comparisons to the geology of our neighboring planets.  Other topics include natural resources, radiometric dating methods, rocks and minerals, and a look at Earth’s past. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY/COMPARATIVE ANATOMY (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion of Biology I with a grade of “B” or higher AND completion or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry I.

 

This course introduces basic concepts and principles important to an understanding of the human body functions as an integrated unit.  The two major goals are homeostasis and pathology.  Human Physiology/Comparative Anatomy is a course open to juniors and seniors who have successfully completed Biology I.  This course is for students who have a genuine interest in studying the form and function of the human body in depth.  All eleven body systems covering anatomy and physiology are presented.  This course will prepare students for a career in medicine or laboratory work.  Students will be required to dissect a cat in conjunction with the study of morphology and physiology of man. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  LIFE SCIENCE

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

PREREQUISITE: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra 101.

 

This full year course is designed to review the fundamentals of life science.  The core topics are the scientific method, characteristics, diversity, and needs of living things, cellular components and functions, heredity and genes, DNA structure and function, evolution, and ecology.  Laboratory activities, projects, and other assignments will emphasize the scientific method and core components of the course.

 

COURSE TITLE:  METEOROLOGY (NOT OFFERED 2015-2016)

CREDITS:  ½  Unit - One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion of one year of a science course.

 

Meteorology is a one-semester course that investigates atmospheric science in the overall context of the Earth Sciences.  Weather will be studied in terms of atmospheric composition, fluid dynamics, heat and energy transfer, and the instruments and technology used to measure these phenomena.  Climate and historical climate changes on earth, as well as our present understanding of weather systems on other plants, are among the topics covered.

 

COURSE TITLE:  INTRODUCTION TO CHEMISTRY & PHYSICAL SCIENCE (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE: Concurrent enrollment in Algebra 102 or higher.

 

Introduction to Chemistry and Physical Science is a full-year course and serves as a foundation for chemistry and physics. Chemical concepts covered include scientific measurement, elements, compounds and mixtures, history of atomic theory, modern atomic theory, electron structure, chemical bonding, chemical reactions and the gas laws. Topics covered in physics include gravity and laws of motion, kinematics, simple and compound machines, energy systems, wave dynamics (light & sound), and electromagnetic theory and applications. Earth and space science will also be reviewed.

Introduction to Chemistry & Physical Science emphasizes key skills for successful completion of chemistry and physical science. Math proficiency is important in the course.

 

COURSE TITLE:  PHYSICS (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in Pre-Calculus or higher. 

 

Physics is a full-year science course that is laboratory-oriented.  It is aimed at the student who wants to inquire about the nature of physical happenings.  The science of physics involves four basic areas: mechanics (Newton’s Law, planetary and space motions, work, energy), optics (light, mirrors, lenses), electricity and magnetism. Rigorous mathematics is involved

 

COURSE TITLE:  SPACE SCIENCE (NOT OFFERED 2015-2016)

CREDITS: ½ Unit - One Semester 

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

 

Space Science is a one-semester course offering a descriptive study of astronomy and aerodynamics.  Topics in astronomy include the solar system, the sun and stars, galaxies, and the latest astronomical discoveries on-line.  Newton=s laws of motion and the physics of spaceflight will be explored in the aerodynamic portion of the course as a practical method of reaching our neighbors in space. 

 

SOCIAL SCIENCE

                                                                                                       

COURSE TITLE:  AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (Required) (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of World History and U.S. History.

 

American Government is a full-year course and is required for seniors.  Students will examine our American governmental and political system in depth.  The structure and operation of local, state, and federal governments will be studied, and students will be exposed to some of the problems of government at all levels.  In addition, the course will also touch on alternative governmental systems used in our world today.   During the year, special emphasis will be placed on our federal constitution and the Illinois State constitution.  All students, as a course requirement, must pass federal and state constitution tests.

 

At the successful completion of American Government, a student should understand the following:

1.            The major concepts of American democracy.

2.            The impact of the mass media and public opinion in their role in American politics.

3.            The role of the Supreme Court as the nation=s highest court, and the significance of typical review in the American government system.

4.            The relationship of the protection of civil rights and liberties to national security, and the constitutional guarantees of equality before the law.

 

COURSE TITLE:  AP UNITED STATES HISTORY (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   6/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion of World History with a grade of “B” or higher and teacher recommendation.

 

An Advanced Placement course is available to pursue a program which is the equivalent of an introductory college course.  This course is designed to study the history of the United States chronologically with an emphasis on interpretation and analysis of the material by contemporary and modern histories.  It is assumed that the students will acquire a basic understanding of the factual material before entering into the classroom discussions and opinions.  This course not only will use several texts, but also computer software and primary source documents.  This level of history will provide students with the opportunity to take the Advanced Placement Examination in United States History sponsored by the College Board.  Taking this test is not required for the course, but students are encouraged to take it.  There is an additional fee for the test.

 

COURSE TITLE:  CIVIL WAR (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit Per Semester (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of World History.

 

Civil War is a one-semester elective course offered in the fall semester and open to juniors and seniors.  The course will bring about a greater understanding of this war between states by emphasizing and focusing on slavery and the antebellum South; the causes of the Civil War; the battles, campaigns, and leaders of the war; and the period of Reconstruction.

 

COURSE TITLE:  CURRENT AFFAIRS (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - Each Semester (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

 

Using periodicals of current events, students will take a close-up look at the leaders and events of present time.  The students will learn to understand and evaluate the news.  The participant will be exposed to geography, sociology, economics, and tomorrow’s history.  Students may take current affairs one or two semesters each year and still receive credit.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ECONOMICS (NOT OFFERED 2015-2016)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISITE: Completion or concurrent enrollment in U.S. History.

 

Economics is a full-year course for college-bound juniors and seniors.  It will be a study of Macroeconomics and Microeconomics.  This course is highly recommended for college bound students.

 

Microeconomics is a study of parts of the economy, particularly specific markets or market organizations.  It examines the behavior of households and businesses, prices and outputs in markets, and application to public policy.  Macroeconomics is an economic theory that studies the economy as a whole, especially income theory and policy.  The goal of the class is to equip the students with the analytical tools to reason out economic problems.  The emphasis is not on memorization of facts, but instead on developing an ability to define and analyze economic problems.   

 

COURSE TITLE:  GLOBAL STUDIES (WORLD GEOGRAPHY) (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS: ½ Unit Per Year (Fall and Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

 

This course is designed to look at two things.  First, it describes and analyzes the physical features of the earth (environment).  Secondly, it looks at how living things, in particular man-kind; interact with their environment and how the environment often dictates the course of human events.  To facilitate and enhance geographic inquiry, the structure of the course will revolve around the five themes of geography: location, place (physical features), human and environmental interaction, movement, and regions (comparing and contrasting).  In addition, the course will illustrate the interdependency of the world as it exists today, and will stress the importance of learning and appreciating the achievements of differing cultural groups.

 

COURSE TITLE:  ILLINOIS HISTORY (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

 

This course will look at the history of Illinois from the Indian period to the French and English periods, and on through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  This study will focus on both downstate Illinois and the Chicago area, thus providing an understanding of the rural and agricultural areas of the state as well as the urban and industrialized centers.  Particular emphasis will be placed on the settlement patterns of the state, its economy, and its major political figures.  This course will also examine the cultural heritage of Illinois, the characteristics of its citizens, and the writings of its great literary figures.

 

COURSE TITLE:  PSYCHOLOGY (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit Per Year (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of at least one full year of a social studies course.

 

Psychology is a semester course. This course is a survey of the various factors influencing behavior, including biological foundations of behavior, perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion.  The study of psychology will be based on social behavior using the scientific method.  This course will stress such topics as personality, motivation, emotions, growth and development, mental health, mental illness, and social behavior.

 

At the successful completion of psychology, students should be able to do the following:

 

1.)    Understand and comprehend the foundations of psychology, including the major founders and the principles they followed. Also, students should be able to identify different parts of the brain and understand the functions.

2.)   Recognize, empathize with, and understand multiple psychological disorders and their effects. Students should also be able to apply a treatment plan to each disorder.

3.)    Differentiate between learning and adapting, understand how the brain acquires information, recognize how a personality develops, and apply these principles to real life scenarios.

4.)   Be able to identify how memories form, what impacts or hinders the mind while remembering, the role the dreams play in memories and behavior, and how the brain functions to retain information and sensory material.

5.)   Students cumulate the semester with a project over one specific topic in psych (their choosing). With this topic, students will understand, explain, and apply the knowledge into a textbook chapter or magazine article.

 

COURSE TITLE:  SOCIOLOGY (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit Per Year (Fall)

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of at least one full year of a social studies course.

 

Sociology is a semester course. It is a course about people – how they act, react, and interact in both their everyday lives and under extraordinary circumstances. Sociology is all about social contexts, including groups, ethnic groups, cities, neighborhoods, and societies, as well as their thoughts, feelings, and ideas. Students will learn to observe, describe, analyze, and predict people’s behavior. This course provides a comprehensive, in-depth coverage of all the major areas of the discipline of sociology. This course combines an interweaving of narrative, notes, case studies, experiments, observations, and practical applications.

At the successful completion of sociology, the student should be able to do the following:

 

1.)    Understand and recognize cultures, values, norms, and societies.

2.)    Observe deviance, distinguish the difference between different types of crime, and create solutions for a less deviant society.

3.)    Comprehend and empathize with social and economic stratification functions in the United States, as well as develop resolutions for a more fair and structured society.

4.)    Recognize the difference between race and ethnicity, sex and gender, and other differences among people. Also, students should be able to pinpoint the beginning of race in America, analyze the role of race and gender in society, and understand its power over American culture.

 

COURSE TITLE:  UNITED STATES HISTORY (Required) (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE: Concurrent enrollment in a junior English course.

 

United States History is a required course for juniors.  The course is composed of a study of American History from the Civil War through the 20th Century, including not only politics and wars, but the experiences and opportunities of all the groups of people that make up America.  The student will understand how America’s past successes and achievements as well as failures and mistakes have shaped the present.  Themes of study will be introduced to help the student understand the flow of United States History and learn how events and movements are connected with one another across time.  Original documents and primary source analysis will be utilized.  Students will complete a research paper in conjunction with their English 301 and 302 classes, which is a requirement for the course.

 

COURSE TITLE:  WORLD HISTORY (Required) (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   4/4

PREREQUISITE: Concurrent enrollment in a sophomore English course.

 

Word History is required of all sophomores.  The course is a study of the various peoples, institutions, and events that have characterized and shaped human society since the first civilizations.  Included in this study is a look at the geographical, cultural, economic, political, religious, and social characteristics of the civilizations that have inhabited earth.  Students will be required to complete a research paper in conjunction with their English 202 and 203 classes, which is a requirement to pass the course.

               

COURSE TITLE:  WORLD WAR II (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  ½ Unit Per Semester (Spring)

COURSE WEIGHT:   5/4

PREREQUISITE: Successful completion of World History.

 

World War II is a one-semester elective course offered in the spring semester and open to juniors and seniors.  The course will bring about a greater understanding of this global war by emphasizing and focusing on the rise of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany; the causes of the war; the battles, campaigns, and leaders of the war; the Holocaust; and the effects of this great war.

 

SPECIAL EDUCATION

 

COURSE TITLE:  CAREERS

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

This is a one semester course to offer career guidance and explore education and training options.  Students will be asked to research possible career options, job shadow, complete career exploration projects, and create resumes as part of the class.  The class will also include guest speakers and multimedia presentations discussing various career options.

 

COURSE TITLE:  CONSUMER EDUCATION I

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

This is a semester course required of all eligible sophomore students.  The main objective is to teach the student to be a wise consumer.  Some of the topics covered are:

 

1.  Banking

2.  Budgeting

3.  Credit

4.  Comparison shopping (food, clothing, household items, etc.)

5.  Housing

6.  Taxes

7.  Insurance (life, health, car, home owners, renters, etc.)

8.  Transportation

9.  Leisure

 

 

COURSE TITLE:  CONSUMER MATH

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

Consumer math is a full-year course for eligible students and is a course they can take to fill their mathematics requirement for graduation.  This course consists primarily of instruction in:

 

1.  Everyday math (bills, comparison shopping, postal rates, etc.)

2.  Career math (computing pay, figuring deductions, math for specific careers)

3.  Money management (budgeting, banking, savings, investments, taxes, insurance, credit, loans)

4.  Leisure math (sports, travel, and restaurant)

 

COURSE TITLE:  EARTH AND LIFE SCIENCE (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

This course picks up where General Science left off.  Topics covered are:

  

1. Motions of the earth                                

2. Earth and moon system

3. Solar system and galaxies

4. Earth chemistry

5. Minerals in the earth

6. Types of rocks

7. Earth’s different atmospheres

8. Weather and climate                        

9.  Weathering and erosion

10. Forces of the earth

11. Five systems of the human body

12. Senses of the human body

13. Nutrition

14. Plant and animal science

 

 


COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH I (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

English I is required of all eligible freshmen students. The course is designed to develop language skills, individual maturity, self-awareness, and independent living skills within the following areas of study:

 

1.  Basic Skills - Written Language

 

A.  Basic grammar and usage

B.  Reading comprehension

C.  Spelling

D.  Basic composition                                                

E.  Listening skills

F.  Study skills

 

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH II (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

English II is required for all eligible sophomore students. Students will focus on the three language arts areas: writing, grammar, and reading literature.  Literature genres covered include: short stories, plays, essays, and novels.  As a requirement of this class the students are expected to write a research paper in conjunction with World History. Students must pass English I first.

A.  Grammar review

B.  Reading comprehension

C.  Study skills

D.  Using reference materials and resources

E.  Spelling and writing

F.  Listening skills

             G. Vocabulary skills

 

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH III (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

English III is required of all eligible junior students. Students will focus on the three language arts areas: writing, grammar, and reading literature.  Literature genres covered include: short stories, plays, essays, and novels.  As a requirement of this class the students are expected to write a research paper in conjunction with U.S. History. English I and English II must be completed first.

 

 

A.  Survival reading (newspaper, etc.)

B.  Reading comprehension

C.  Survival writing (applications, letters)

D.  Spelling

E.  Grammar review

F.  Vocabulary skills

G.  Study skills

 

 

COURSE TITLE:  ENGLISH IV (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS: 1 Unit  Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

English IV is a course open to all eligible senior students. Students will focus on the three language arts areas: writing, grammar, and reading literature.  Literature genres covered include: short stories, plays, essays, and novels.  As a requirement of this class the students are expected to write a research paper.

 

COURSE TITLE:  HEALTH EDUCATION I

CREDITS:  ½ Unit - One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

Health Education I is a semester course open to all eligible sophomores. This course is an introduction to some of the following areas of study:

 

 

1.  Mental health

2.  Relating to others

3.  Physical health

4.  Using and abusing drugs

5.  Safety

6.  First aid

7.  Diseases

8.  Human sexuality

 

 

COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL MATH (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

Introduction to General Math is a full-year course for eligible freshmen and is one course they can take to fill their mathematics requirement for graduation.  This course consists primarily of instruction in:

 

 

1.  Reading and writing numbers

2.  Basic facts and operations

3.  Calculator usage operations

4.  Measurements

5.  Time

 

 

6.  Fractions

7.  Decimals

8.  Ratios

9.  Percents

10. Graphs

11. Pre-algebra skills

 

 

COURSE TITLE: INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL SCIENCE (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

Introduction to general science is a full-year course which is required and is open to all eligible freshmen students.  This course introduces the student to most fields of study in the general science area.  The following areas of study can be covered:

 

 

1.  Weather

2.  Electricity

3.  Environment and energy sources

4.  Nutrition

5.  Practical plant and animal science

6.  First aid

7.  Basic biology - The human body

                8.  Physical science

                9.  Earth science

 

COURSE TITLE:  SRC RESOURCE

CREDITS:  ¼ Unit-One Semester

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

Good study habits are the focal point of this course.  Resource class is designed to help students develop effective study skills to ultimately improve their grades.  This class will allow students to gain a valuable understanding of organizational skills, being prepared for class, and completing assignments.  Students will also engage in online test preparation programs. Students enrolling in the SRC Resource will sign a contract at the beginning of the year to acknowledge the option to earn credit for the class. Grades will be issued as Pass/Fail dependent upon their participation in the specific daily activities.  This semester course is encouraged for all students throughout the year.  In addition, Resource will offer independent study time for students on a daily basis. 

 

COURSE TITLE:  STUDY SKILLS

CREDITS:  ½ Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

This is a year-long course to offer strategies, guidance, and support necessary for academic success.  More specifically, students will receive daily assistance in the areas of organization, note-taking skills, quiz and test preparation, and assignment completions.  Grades will be determined based upon daily student participation and assignments given in the above outlined areas.

 

COURSE TITLE:  AMERICAN GOVERNMENT I (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

American Government I is a full-year course for eligible senior students. This course is required for graduation.  There are no prerequisites for this course. *The student must pass the federal and state constitution exam.  This course consists primarily of instruction in:

 

1. Development and creation of American government

              2. U.S. Constitution

A. Legislative branch

B. Executive branch

C. Judicial branch

              3. State Constitution

A. Legislative branch

B. Executive branch

C. Judicial branch

              4. Local governments

              5. Relationship between the citizen and the government

A. Citizen Responsibilities

B. Government services/community resources

 

COURSE TITLE:  UNITED STATES HISTORY I (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

This is a required course for all eligible junior students.  The course is composed of studying American history and politics. The main areas of study are:

 

1.  Our American heritage

2.  Growth and development of the United States

3.  Structure and function of the United States government and how it developed.

4.  Civil War era

5.  The Industrial Age

6.  World War I and II Era

                7.  The Space Age

                8.  U.S. Geography

 

 

COURSE TITLE:  WORLD HISTORY I (NCAA Approved)

CREDITS:  1 Unit Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:   3/4

 

This is a required course for all eligible sophomore students. The course is designed to help students become more aware of their global environment.  Students will explore other cultures, economics and how it affects the U.S.

 

1. World Geography

A. Physical geography

B. Political geography

C. Human geography

2. U.S. and Canadian history

3. Latin American history

4. African history

5. Middle Eastern history

6. Western European history

7. Russia and Eastern European history

8. Central and Eastern Asia history

 

SANGAMON AREA SPECIAL

EDUCATION DISTRICT

 

The Williamsville Community Unit District #15 is a member of Sangamon Area Special Education District.  SASED provides services in the area of psychological testing and consultation; physical and occupational therapy; social workers; instructors for learning disabled and physically and mentally handicapped; behavioral disordered; speech therapy; and visually and hearing impaired students. Additionally, SASED and Williamsville High School offer eligible students the opportunity to participate in the Secondary Transition Experience Program (STEP), which allows them to be employed and earn high school graduation credit. Parents may call the guidance office or the special education department at Williamsville High School for additional information and advice regarding services provided.  The content and results of interviews and testing services remain confidential and are only conducted with the written consent of the parent or guardian.

 

LINCOLNLAND TECHNICAL

EDUCATION CENTER

 

COURSE TITLE: VOCATIONAL – LINCOLN TECHNICAL EDUCATION CENTER

CREDITS: 3 Units Per Year

COURSE WEIGHT:  4/4

COURSE OPEN TO: Grades 11 & 12

 

Automotive Mechanics

Building Trades I & II

Computer Repair

Cosmetology

Criminal Justice-Legal Services

Culinary Arts 1 & 2

Digital Media

Health Occupations

Welding

 

Note: There is limited enrollment in this program and course offerings are subject to change.

 

Details

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES

 

Williamsville High School will accept courses taken from accredited institutions that are approved by the guidance department and administration.  Do not enroll in any school with the thought that credit is automatically transferable!  Correspondence credit is awarded to students on a remedial basis only.  Students who are taking correspondence courses must check with the guidance office prior to making a commitment to any correspondence school.  Seniors who are approved to take correspondence credit(s) and who plan to graduate on time with their class must have a transcript presented to the high school office no later than May 1 of the year of graduation.  Failure to do so will jeopardize graduation status.

 

 

Dual Enrollment Option-First Year Experience

at Lincoln Land Community College

 

Students who have obtained 12th grade status at Williamsville High School have the opportunity to receive a total of two (2) credits for classes they complete at Lincoln Land Community College and apply that credit toward graduation. Students must receive guidance counselor approval for the dual enrollment option.  In the month of March, an approved list of LLCC First Year Experience classes for dual enrollment will be available. Each semester course taken at Lincoln Land Community College will count as one (1.0) credit toward graduation and will be applied to the student’s high school transcript on a Pass/Fail basis. Dual enrollment courses may apply to classes that are being taken during the school day as the student’s schedule allows or after school hours. The student shall pay all dues and fees for dual enrollment classes taken and a release of responsibility must be signed by the parent/guardian. The release of responsibility must be on file at the high school prior to the student attending college classes that meet during the school day (before 4pm). In order for students to leave the high school campus before the end of the normal school day, they must be enrolled in the First Year Experience program. Students taking dual enrollment courses will follow all WHS course change policies. If a student chooses to drop a dual enrollment course past the WHS drop deadline (even though it may not affect the college transcript), it is not guaranteed that the student can obtain a full schedule to earn those credits for that semester at WHS. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of all LLCC drop policies. Students must notify the guidance department if they drop a class immediately.   

 

Details